Boarding the Oceania Insignia

The bus from the Blue Lagoon dropped us of at Skafabakki Harbour, where the Insignia was already docked. We entered our home for the next 15 days and it felt like a ghost ship – there was no one in sight! Having been on bigger cruise ships we’re used to having to wait in line for a bit to get checked in but this time we just walked straight through, seeing almost ten crew members but not a single guest until we hit the Waves Grill, Oceania’s poolside grill. It’s our favourite venue for lunch and the Grilled Reuben Sandwich is still as good as I remembered from our last cruise. Being a German living in Switzerland I guess I just can’t resist the combination of Sauerkraut and Swiss cheese 😉

We had booked a mid-ship inside stateroom on a low deck because both Rik and I are prone to seasickness and that’s the most stable place on the ship. We were assigned a handicapped cabin which means it’s a lot bigger than a normal inside cabin but the layout is a bit weird. There is no couch and the TV is next to the bed rather than in front of it. Also the TV is tiny – smaller than my computer screen at home – and for some reason it uses only half of that tiny screen to actually show the movie… But we don’t plan on spending much time in the cabin anyways so it doesn’t really matter.

 

The Blue Lagoon

We got up early on day two to catch a bus to another Icelandic classic: the Blue Lagoon. It’s a geothermal spa that received it’s name because of the bright blue colour of the water. It is man-made but the water naturally maintains 37 to 39 °C because it runs close to lava in the ground before being fed into the pool. When you get close to the areas of the pool where the water gets injected you feel that it is actually way hotter, but it cools down because the air temperature is much lower.

At the lagoon we were able to store our luggage before getting changed and washing ourselves, which gets taken very seriously in Iceland, and spending about an hour in the pool which was very relaxing. The water is rich in minerals such as silica and sulfur and it’s believed that it has “healing powers” – but then again more than half of all Icelanders believe in invisible elves so I’m not sure if you can trust them. What I can attest to is that they are not lying when they tell you the water will make your hair hard to manage. Even though I followed the instructions and put tons of conditioner in my hair it felt – and looked – like straw for a few days.